Roadmap to Job Search Success with LinkedIn

Guest blog by the LinkedIn Careers Team

 

Learn Something New with LinkedIn

LinkedIn is helping people discover and develop the skills they need through a personalized, data-driven learning experience.

Browse different Marketing jobs, descriptions, and even salary info

Have you spent hours, days, or even weeks scrolling through hundreds of job listings trying to identify the “perfect job title” that fits your interests? You’re not alone. One of the biggest challenges job seekers have is knowing what types of jobs to search for in their job search, or even which jobs exist (e.g: Sales Jobs).

Industry information updated by LinkedIn

LinkedIn heard you and as a result launched new career pages designed with the applicant in mind. Now, job seekers and students unfamiliar with the professional landscape can browse job titles within various job functions. LinkedIn surfaces popular titles and listings, as well as top cities and companies for a specific job (e.g., Human Resources jobs), making it easier for job seekers and exploring students to learn more about opportunities in various fields.

Now that you’ve found the right path, start diving in by learning new skills.

Discover and Develop New Skills Via LinkedIn Learning Video

Each week presents a new opportunity for you to learn the skills necessary to take on the next big challenge.

LinkedIn Learning wants to do everything possible to help make that happen.

That’s why each week more classes are added to the 10,000+ course library. LinkedIn’s goal is to help people discover and develop the skills they need through a personalized, data-driven learning experience.

Take Your New Skills to the Next Level and Achieve Your Goal!
You can identify which skills are key to achieving business goals, and learn those skills in a personalized, efficient way. Delve into paths that are available to you with your new skill set via the Linkedin career exploration pages. There you can discover jobs by function, with job titles you didn’t even know existed, and relevant salary information.

Learn Something New with LinkedIn

Guest blog by the LinkedIn Careers Team

LinkedIn is helping people discover and develop the skills they need through a personalized, data-driven learning experience.

Browse different Marketing jobs, descriptions, and even salary info

Have you spent hours, days, or even weeks scrolling through hundreds of job listings trying to identify the “perfect job title” that fits your interests? You’re not alone. One of the biggest challenges job seekers have is knowing what types of jobs to search for in their job search, or even which jobs exist (e.g: Sales Jobs).

Industry information updated by LinkedIn

LinkedIn heard you and as a result launched new career pages designed with the applicant in mind. Now, job seekers and students unfamiliar with the professional landscape can browse job titles within various job functions. LinkedIn surfaces popular titles and listings, as well as top cities and companies for a specific job (e.g., Human Resources jobs), making it easier for job seekers and exploring students to learn more about opportunities in various fields.

Now that you’ve found the right path, start diving in by learning new skills.

Discover and Develop New Skills Via LinkedIn Learning Video

Each week presents a new opportunity for you to learn the skills necessary to take on the next big challenge.

LinkedIn Learning wants to do everything possible to help make that happen.

That’s why each week more classes are added to the 10,000+ course library. LinkedIn’s goal is to help people discover and develop the skills they need through a personalized, data-driven learning experience.

<p><strong><a href=”https://www.linkedin.com/learning/learning-linkedin-for-students/linkedin-learning?trk=embed_lil” title=”LinkedIn Learning”>LinkedIn Learning</a></strong> from <strong><a href=”https://www.linkedin.com/learning/learnin,dents</a></strong> by <strong><a href=”https://www.linkedin.com/learning/instructors/oliver-schinkten?trk=embed_lil”>Oliver Schinkten</a></strong></p>

LinkedIn Learning combines industry-leading content from Lynda.com with LinkedIn’s professional data and network. Get a unique view of how jobs, industries, organizations, and skills evolve over time powered by more than 500 million member profiles, including billions of engagements. From this, LinkedIn can identify the skills you need and deliver expert-led courses to help you obtain those skills. It takes the guesswork out of learning!

Take Your New Skills to the Next Level and Achieve Your Goal!
You can identify which skills are key to achieving business goals, and learn those skills in a personalized, efficient way. Delve into paths that are available to you with your new skill set via the Linkedin career exploration pages. There you can discover jobs by function, with job titles you didn’t even know existed, and relevant salary information.

 

Unleashing the Power of LinkedIn’s ProFinder

Guest blog by the LinkedIn Careers Team

LinkedIn ProFinder is a marketplace that connects top quality freelance or independent professionals with new clients and leads.

ProFinder is a freelance marketplace that consists of over 70,000 vetted professionals

Getting Started

 Having a complete profile is the most important piece to getting opportunities, as it’s one of the first things potential clients will see.

There are five main pieces to consider when building a successful profile:

  • Profile photo – A professional picture is the key to making a good first impression. This image should be clear, warm, and memorable.
  • Headline – It’s important to make sure that your headline matches the services that you originally selected on ProFinder, otherwise your specialties become unclear.
  • Summary – Your summary is a great place to highlight your passions and accomplishments in your own words. This is a valuable section that helps you stand out.
  • Recommendations
  • Recommendations are essential, as they can be the difference in whether you’re hired or ignored. Please bear in mind that it’s quality before quantity. A great recommendation has three parts:
  • Clearly defines your role in the project and its completion.
  • References the skills utilized.
  • Includes a date.
  • Published Articles
  • The quickest way to build your brand is with LinkedIn’s publishing platform. You can write about anything from industry trends to career accomplishments. It’s important to write about what you know. This will help establish yourself as an industry expert, since your content will be displayed on your ProFinder profile and available to all LinkedIn users (not just your connections).

Relevant Experience

It may seem like an obvious statement, but it’s easier to get the job if you have done it before! Maintaining a portfolio of your previous work will demonstrate that you have the skillset to be successful. By keeping your profile up-to-date, future clients will be able to see what you’ve done and how you can help them.

With LinkedIn’s ProFinder, you can be a part of the ~35% of freelancers in the workforce. Start picking up leads in no time with a well-crafted profile, a little bit of experience, and some help from previous customers. Remember that the early bird gets the worm, so respond to your requests for proposal as soon as you can!

 

Find Your Earning Potential with LinkedIn Salary

Guest blog by the LinkedIn Careers Team

LinkedIn Salary is a tool that provides detailed breakdowns of salary by job title and location.

Your job search is as easy as filtering by title and location.

Overview

 LinkedIn Salary acts as a free resource for users to obtain job salary insights and understand the various attributes that impact pay, so they can make more informed career decisions. The tool shares salary insights for specific job titles, and different factors that impact pay scale: location, years of experience, industry, company size, and education level. LinkedIn also uses this data to provide personalized features and recommendations.

 Types of Insights Available on LinkedIn Salary

On LinkedIn Salary, you can find aggregate salary information and trends that can help you compare your earning potential to others in the same or similar role. You can also explore compensation for other roles and locations as well.

After you enter your salary details, you’ll can view what members earn on average for a specific role and city, broken down by:

  • Base salary
  • Total compensation
  • Additional earnings such as annual bonus or sign-on bonus

You can use the Industry and Years of Experience filters to learn how these factors impact pay for a given title. Whether you’re just starting out or are an entrepreneur, you can filter your settings.

In addition, you’ll also see the following, based on the type of data available:

Company salaries:Dive into company level insight pages to explore how salaries vary at different corporations.

  • Factors that may impact salary:Learn how certain aspects such as company size, industry, education level, and field of study can impact your salary for a given title in a region.
  • Top-paying locations:Discover which locations pay the most for a title and see the number of job openings there.
  • Open jobs:We’ll also show you current open jobs for your role and location that have been posted on LinkedIn. You can also look into freelance opportunities.

Dig into insights, such as size and average salary.

 Getting Started To build this data, users must first submit their average salary information. When submitting one’s salary, they can also add additional compensation details such as a sign-on bonus or company shares provided.

 

Begin networking today!

Social network

Networking is the act of building relationships and partnerships with business professionals that are capable and interested in helping you further your career goals.

Believe it or not it is never too early in your college career to begin networking and the earlier you begin making connections, the better.

In an article for immigration and education reform advocacy website FWD.us, contributor, Joshua Rodriguez, wrote about struggling in his classes and having a hard time finding an internship the summer after his freshman year of college.

He writes, “Never in my life had I gotten C’s before, and it was difficult to understand why I was struggling in college.” Going into his sophomore year, he realized that he had to take a different approach to his studies and job search. He states this hard truth in the article:

“College shifts the responsibility of education from the teacher and institution to the student. You are in charge of educating yourself and making sure that you are getting what you need”.

The fact of the matter is that whether or not you need assistance in your job search or your classes, this is assistance that you’ll need to seek out yourself.

Who can you include in your network?

  • Past employers
  • Past and current professors and high school teachers
  • Family friends

You can begin forming these connections by asking yourself this question: What do I aim to achieve through my network?

According to Rodriguez, if you’re looking for assistance in your college courses, then your goal might be to build professional relationships with your professors that enable you to feel comfortable asking for their help.

If you’re looking to acquire an internship over the summer, your goal might be to build professional relationships with people that can serve as a reference for a job application.

However, don’t limit your network to people in your immediate social circle. Emily Bennington, owner of Professional Studio 365, an organization that helps students transition into careers post-graduation, suggests, “checking out conferences in your field or your local Chamber of Commerce.”

Don’t be afraid to go out and seek mentors! Start making connections today! Contact your professors or visit the USF Career Success Center for help researching job and internship options.

USF Career Success Center

Tower Hall N204

8:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

References

Grant, A. (2011, 28 September 2011). 6 ways to network while you’re in college. U.S. News & World Report

Rodriguez, J. (5 April, 2015). Your network is your net worth: Using your network to succeed in college. Retrieved from http://www.imfirst.org/2015/04/networking-in-college/

Is your thank you letter in the mail?

Hand Written Thank You Note

Previously, we had talked about the importance of enclosing a cover letter with your job application and personalizing it, to ensure, that you’re addressing the job requirements while explaining your qualifications.

Though this may seem like a tedious task, it is one that will show employers you have thoughtfully considered how your skillset could best serve the company.

This week, we’re going to talk about another often overlooked component of the job application and interview process: the thank you letter. Commonly, thank you letters are a great way to show gratitude for a gift that you have received.

And, when a hiring manager calls you in for an interview, they are gifting you their time. So, use it wisely and then follow up with a thank you.

Thank you letters (or emails, we’ll get to which one is better in a second) allow you to do three things:

  • Show that you have good manners: Like when showing gratitude for a gift, a thank you letter sent after an interview shows the interviewer that you are thankful for their consideration of you.
  • Show that you’re serious about the job position: According to a CareerBuilder.com survey, those who don’t send a thank you letter or email following an interview—a shocking 57% of job applicants—“stick out as a sore thumb” to hiring managers.
  • Reiterate points that were made in the interview by you or the interviewer: Show that you were being attentive during the interview while making sure that the interviewer remembers specific information about you.

According to Monster.com, whether or not you send a thank you email or letter is largely dependent upon where you’re applying.

If you know a hiring decision is not likely to be made for a couple of weeks, then sending a thank you letter through snail mail is fine, and at a more traditional company, may be preferable.

If you know that the decision will be made within 48 hours of your interview, then it is beneficial to send a thank you email to make sure that the message travels fast and is sent to the appropriate person.

Employers want to hire employees that are committed to the company and are grateful for the experience. Be one of the few that shows appreciation before even getting the job offer.

USF Career Success Center

Tower Hall N204

MWF 8:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

References:

Doyle, A. (11 May 2017). Job interview thank you letter examples. Retrieved from https://www.thebalance.com/job-interview-thank-you-letter-examples-2063964

Kaufman, Z. C. (2017). Job interview thank you: Is it better to send a letter or email?. Retrieved from https://www.monster.com/career-advice/article/interview-thank-you-email-letter

 

The cover letter: the hidden gem to landing an interview

Rejected Resumes

In most cases, employers won’t look at a job applicant’s resume until they’ve read their cover letter, and if the letter doesn’t convince the hiring manager and/or executive director that you’re the right person for the job, your resume will most likely be thrown in the trash.

What exactly is a cover letter, you ask? Simply, it is a letter that is addressed to the hiring manager and/or executive director of a company and explains an applicant’s qualifications for the job.

It allows the applicant to go into more depth regarding their skills and qualifications than their resume allows, although, like a resume, it too should be short.

The most important element to writing a cover letter is directly addressing the needs of the company and position to which you’re applying.

The hiring manager or executive director will want to ensure that an applicant has a basic understanding of the company’s mission and needs.

For example, the Illinois Spina Bifida Association (ISBA) is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that “works to improve the quality of life of individuals and families living with Spina Bifida [a spinal cord disorder]”.

So, the applicant would need to understand how the organization is currently achieving their mission e.g. ISBA provides in-home social work services; sleepaway camp for individuals with Spina Bifida looking to become more independent and provides youth and adult support groups.

The opening paragraph of a cover letter should address who you are, what position you’re applying for and how you came to hear about the job listing. Did you see a newspaper ad about it? If a respected employee of the company or organization told you about the position, make sure to include that information.

As a precursor to the following paragraph, where you’ll be explaining your qualifications in detail, write an opening of 1-2 sentences that summarizes why you believe your qualifications make you the right person for the job. For example:

“As a recent graduate of University of St. Francis where I studied Communications with a concentration in PR/Advertising and Journalism, I believe I have a deep understanding of how to target messaging and branding towards specific audiences. It is my hope that my educational background combined with five years of experience working for ABC Advertising Firm, as a project manager, will prompt you to consider me for the position of Marketing Research Analyst.”

The body paragraphs are where you’ll want to elaborate on the specific qualifications you have that are applicable to the position you’re applying for. For example, if the job posting specifies that the company is looking for someone who can, “improve quality results by studying, evaluating, and re-designing processes; implementing changes”; then, you may want to mention any experience you’ve had as a project manager. For example:

“At ABC Advertising, I was tasked with leading a team of graphic designers to create a logo for a sports recreation facility. It was during this time that I came to learn the importance of evaluating progress not only within the context of the finished product but in the ability of the team to work together. My considerations have helped me better manage my creative teams and increased overall workplace efficiency.”

The closing paragraph of your cover letter should reiterate why you’re qualified for the position, and as a personal touch, why you think the company is the right fit for you. Make it clear that you’re interested in interviewing for the position and that you’ll be in touch.

Sign your name, include your contact information and check for any grammar or spelling mistakes and you’re good to go!

Visit the USF Career Success Center for cover letter writing assistance

USF Career Success Center

Tower Hall N204

MWF 8:00 a.m. 4:30 p.m.

References:

Doyle, A. (18 June 2017). How to write a successful cover letter. Retrieved from https://www.thebalance.com/how-to-write-a-cover-letter-2060169